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Ruby Fortune 100 gratis spins and $1000 free bonus (register)

Ruby Fortune 100 gratis spins and $1000 free bonus (register)

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Ruby Fortune Casino Online Review

Fair. Easy. Safe. Fun. These four words were printed along the top of the Ruby Fortune Casino when we made our first virtual trip to the site. Whether these four words were accurate descriptors or not was something we planned to find out. Going into our review, all the information we had was that the Ruby Fortune Casino was part of the Palace Casino Group that had been around since the early 2000’s.
Initially, we expected a carbon copy of the other Palace Group sites we had reviewed, but to our surprise (and a pleasant surprise at that) the Ruby Fortune looked to be significantly different than the other Palace Casino Group sites. Yes, we’re talking about the look and feel but also at first glance it looked like the game selection, and a few of the more integral parts of the site were also different (and much better).
The biggest difference that jumped out to us was the number of games to choose from and the quality of the games. In other previous Palace Casino Group reviews, the game selection was good, not great, and the quality of the games was mediocre with no branded games. Immediately, we saw Game of Thrones and Jurassic Park and a ton more branded games from Microgaming jumping off the page.
Honestly, it looks like Ruby Fortune may be the bread winner out of the Palace Casino Group websites where they spend all their money and have the best games and amenities. To be sure of this, we, of course, needed to dig into the site and give it a full review. As always with our reviews, we’re not here to write a positive puff piece that aims to make you feel good. We’re here to give you the down and dirty on the site whether that’s a lot of good, a lot of bad, or even a lot of ugly.
If you’ve ever read any of our other reviews, you know that we don’t hold back. If we see something we don’t like or want to see improved, or we’re even just having a bad day, we will let a site have it. We want you to be able to trust the information you get from our reviews so you can make a more educated decision about where you want to play.
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Ratings Breakdown

Overall

We were pleasantly surprised with the Ruby Fortune casino as they not only exceeded the quality of their sister sites, but they also had high enough quality to be considered a real player in the industry. Game selection was really good with a lot of high quality branded slots and an incredible amount of table game variations (more than most top sites). The site’s user interface needed work, but the user interfaces of the games were great. The site lost points, though, because their bonus promotions were near nonexistent outside of a few initial deposit bonuses. They also need to do a better job of posting limits and time frames on their banking options. Small changed, but still, things we want to see improved if they want to improve their rating score with us. Overall, this is definitely a site that slot players and table game players who like game variations are going to like.

Ruby Fortune Game Variety

We actually expected this to be the exact same as all other Palace Casino Group sites (good but not great) but in fact, this site had a TON of games to choose from. All games were high quality and available for free play without even creating an account to allow you to test them out. Many of these games were branded as well which is typically the highest quality of games available. The site also had a ton of table/casino game options and even several live dealer game options. As you’ll see when we get deeper into this review, game variety is on point.

Ruby Fortune Banking

The site had a bunch of different deposit and withdrawal options which was great to see. This included all the big player options like debit and credit cards, PayPal, Skrill, and more. Our 4/5 here is not one that we firmly stand behind because we have a lot of incomplete information from the site. They post the different deposit and withdrawal options (and the options are great), but they don’t mention any fees, limits, or processing times. We’re led to believe based on the reputation of the company that everything is good, but we want to make sure that you’re aware you may want to get a little more information from support before choosing which method to withdraw with.

Ruby Fortune Bonuses

Frankly, this might be a little generous. The bonus promotions are extremely weak with nothing more than a match deposit bonus on your first three deposits. After that, there are no bonuses or VIP programs ever. The play through on these bonuses is also very high at 50x, so it’s going to take you a bit longer to clear them. While play through is the industry standard, 50x is not. This, unfortunately, is par for the course for a PCG family site. Maybe one day they will hire someone to improve their bonus structures company-wide. Until then, we’ll at least be happy they are offering some free money for playing.

Customer Service

The site had all the options we want to see with customer service with live chat, email, and toll-free phone service. Each option was available 24/7/365 which should make it a 5/5. The reason we docked a point is that on a few pages on the site there was a glitch when trying to access the live chat. It works from most areas of the site, but the small glitch was enough for us to need to dock a point.

User Interface

The user interface at Ruby Fortune is good, but not great. There is absolutely nothing glaringly wrong or anything that anyone without a nitpicky eye like ours is going to see. Most people would probably rate them a little higher here, but we’re in that nitpicky category and proud of it. The games are organized and laid out well, though, there are some small tweaks they could make to make finding the games you want a little bit easier. When you actually get to the games, though, they are from Microgaming, so the quality of the game’s user interfaces is high.

Slots

The slot offerings at Ruby Fortune were MUCH better than they were at their sister sites and were also much better than most of the industry! They had a ton of different options which included a bunch of branded games (games designed after TV shows and movies). These weren’t knock off branded games like Jurassic Dinosaur Park Slots, but the actual Jurassic Park with the images and characters from the movie. Sites love to try and pawn off garbage copies, but these are the real deal.
The slot offerings are not all on one list but are split up into a few categories. By clicking the Games tab, you are taken to a page with their short list of recommended games for you to play. These were all slot games when we checked but we assume at times you may see casino games on here as well as they are all housed under the Games tab.
On the right-hand side of the screen, there are 11 different category options, and it looks like three of them deal with slot machines. The games are all neatly organized in the middle of the screen with their logos. One thing they didn’t have were the names of the games in plain text under the logos like you would see on most sites. This isn’t necessary but is a nice perk because some of the game names are so artistically drawn on the logo that they are tough to read. Trust us on this one; we had to type them all out, and there were several times we had to get a few inches away from the computer screen to make sure we could read them correctly.
This also prevents you from being able to sort the games alphabetically. There was a search function that did work well when we tested it in case you’re looking for a specific game. For your convenience, we’ve included all the games here. If you do start playing on this site, you may want to keep this list handy or bookmark this page so that you can copy and paste game names into the search, so you don’t have to click through 15 tabs to find the game you want.
All games were available to be played for free money without creating an account. This is an awesome way to test out the games before you make a deposit to make sure you’re going to enjoy them. You will need to make sure that you have Flash installed on your computer before loading the games.

Other Casino Games

The casino game offerings at the Ruby Fortune Casino were definitely one of the higher points. If you’re someone who likes a lot of variety and choices in your table/card games, you’re going to be a fan of the Ruby Fortune. The Casino Games section of the site is split up into eight different sections. The layout was organized well, and games were fairly easy to find. Again, though, they did not have the text names below the icon which made a few of them difficult to read and unable to be sorted alphabetically. This was a lot less of a deal than with slots, though, because as expected, there were fewer options.
Something else that was a little odd with the organization was when we clicked on the Live Casino tab we only saw one game offered which we thought was strange. However, when you click on the individual game tabs like Roulette or Blackjack, you see a bunch more Live Dealer options there. It looks like they maybe forgot to list the games again in both sections which would be the correct way to do it.

Ruby Fortune Banking Options

As is proving to be par for the course with PCG casinos, they have a ton of great deposit and withdrawal options but don’t provide much information in regards to limits and fees. From our understanding of the company, most options are fee free, but there are some limitations on the amounts and time frames you can withdraw. The site also requires documentation to withdraw (which is completely industry standard). We only mention this so we can suggest that you take care of this paperwork as soon as you open your account, so you have zero delays when you’re ready to cash off your winnings.

Ruby Fortune Bonuses and Promotions

As with most of the PCG family of sites, the promotions department is weak. Ruby Fortune had deposit bonuses available only for your first three deposits. This is better than some sites (including some in the PCG family) where they only have a first deposit bonus or no bonus at all. The amounts were smaller on these bonuses, but you can always make three deposits right off the bat if you’re looking to put a lot of money on the site. Make sure, though, if you go to do this that you check with support to make sure that there are no stipulations that you have to wait a certain period of time or anything between deposits. We doubt that is the case, but you should check just to be sure.
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Ruby Fortune Customer Service

On the surface, the customer service options look great (exact same for all of Palace Casino Group sites), but we actually had a small issue with their site that we will mention in just a second. Options wise, they had live chat, email, and toll-free phone numbers that were all available 24/7/365. When we went to test out the live chat function, the link opened a pop up that didn’t work. Upon further testing, we realized this was only from one specific page, though, and it worked from the rest of the site. If you need live chat and have trouble accessing it, try clicking the link from a different page on the site, and you should be good to go.

Conclusion

To be completely honest, we weren’t expecting to find such an awesome experience when we reviewed BitStarz. We expected them to be another cookie cutter, run of the mill casino that offered Bitcoin, end of story. What we found was a casino that has hired the right staff and the right developers who have created a really nice product in a tight little package. It’s hard to snuff your nose and super high-quality games, free withdrawals, and creative promotions that are spelled out well and don’t require opt-in.
The only things we’d like to see them get rid of are the small deposit fees, but we can live with that for now with the rest of the perks and the free and instant withdrawals. We definitely recommend giving this casino a try especially because you can check out and play all of the games without even making an account.
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The Featherlight Transmission, Ch. 3

A little while later, I'm in Sector Seven, home of fancy restaurants, galleries, theaters, casinos, and the kinds of whorehouses that get called “social clubs”. I’m already in the general area, and I’m hungry after being harassed with forms for an hour and a half. There’s a place I like here.
It's colorful, clean, and loud in Sector Seven, with a wide-open circular plaza in the middle. Music always in the air, and all kinds of signs begging you to come look, come see what we've got going on tonight. The funhouse of the single-digit folk. You can come to Sector Seven, but remember - you gotta pay if you wanna play.
Being in the Inner Ring, you generally don't see many of my kind in Sector Seven. Most people milling around here are those with heavy purses, and the kind of leaky generosity that for some reason only reaches the hands of politicians and others of their kind rather than hospitals or schools. These kinds of people generally don't like looking at slabs, because we track mud all over the carpet and sometimes accidentally eat their dogs, so we tend not to be welcome in the establishments here. However, the unavoidable fact is that while slabs are definitely ugly and gross, the rich skinnies up here sure as sugar aren't going to be cleaning, fixing, or lifting anything heavy anytime soon, so even here you'll see some of us mixed in with some other poor skinnies that come in from the Outer Ring to do the dirty work.
But of course, everyone's gotta eat. So, if us grunts can't come and spill beer all over the nice white tablecloths, we'll just have to take our credits somewhere else, thanks. And that's where Gulder's Grub enters the picture.
In an alley off the side of Circle Seven, there's a shadowy little spot for people like me. It's not big, but it's an oasis in the middle of a desert of glitzy places that ask an entire month's rent just to come in. A little corner for the ones that actually do all the work. A couple little shops with everyday necessaries, a dingy bar or two, and some diners, all in the shadow of the great towering monuments to that goddess of Sector Seven: Pleasure.
The main (and only) attraction here is Gulder's. It doesn't look like much, just a metal shack with a clapboard menu and a window, but the nosh that Gulder slings is so good that there's always a line, and sometimes you'll even see people in fancy clothes standing in it. You can get a slab-sized sandwich so tasty it'll make you cry, and you can get it without having to take out a third mortgage.
I’ve built up a grave appetite, of a magnitude that only Gulder's is mighty enough to slay. I'm standing in line, behind a skinny in oil-stained overalls. It's nearly lunch, so I've got a while to wait before I get to the front.
The people here are either too tired or too depressed to pay me any mind, which suits me just fine. It’s one of the reasons I like coming here. It’s a misfit shelter. I even know a few arcanists that are willing to come out of the woodwork for one of Gulder’s sandwiches. Believe me, you’d be willing to risk your skin too, if you knew what this alley smelled like. The heavenly aromas bring out all kinds of hungry crazies.
Speaking of which, here's a squirrely-looking slab boy over by some tables that's decided to take his face out of his sandwich and aim it toward my face. I lock eyes with him. Or try to, at least. He can't keep his straight. He's a sizable bit of product, somewhere between six and a half and seven feet, maybe around five hundred fifty pounds. Average enough by our standards. Judging by his lack of clank, jittery eyes, hairless head, and general air of frothy paranoia, I'm guessing he was kind of a shrimpy fella before his procedures.
Those are the dangerous ones. These cats are why every Watchman carries a canister of slabkiller gas when they're out on patrol.
Take a little guy who, let's be honest here, was never destined for great feats of academic achievement. Now put him in a desperate situation. Traumatize him. Make him grow up poor. Give him a tiny dick, make sure he gets plenty of bullies to deal with, both in school and out. Kill his parents, or make them hate and abuse him. Tell all the girls, or boys in some cases, not to look at him. Fire him from his job. Maybe give him a terminal illness, or fill him up with so much unprocessed rage that fire comes out of his nose every time he sneezes. Box him into a corner, put him in a cage so nasty that the only way out is to get slabbed.
It'll work, the cutters at the slab lab say. You're prime material, just what we needed, they say. But he isn't. He's scrawny, malnourished, unintelligent. A sad mess in the shape of a young man. But hey, slabbers need meat. And here it is, direct off the streets. It's not like actual people would ever volunteer for something like this, so we'll make do with the kind of guy that needs the money. So they'll give him some cash, put him on the table, and chop him up anyway, knowing full well that his unimpressive body and sub-average brain won't be able to take it. And he'll come out the other side a twitching, confused, angry kid, with hormones leaking out of his ears and more mental and emotional scars than physical ones, living inside the body of a giant.
You haven't taken him out of that cage. You've just made him strong enough to drag other people in with him.
I zoom in on him and sure as sunrise, he's got an aggression inhibitor bolted to the side of his head, wire running down to meet up with the back of his neck. It's a big one, too. This kid must have some bad habits. Without it, the hot sludge running in his veins would send him into a psychosexual meltdown of nightmarish proportions. Within fifteen minutes he'd either collapse and start seizing until he swallowed his own tongue, or cave to the voices in his head and start raping people to death until someone shot him.
He's still trying to look at me. Hard to maintain an intimidating glare when your eyeballs keep slipping off whatever you're trying to stare down. I think he's jealous of my own eyes. My implants, that is. My old pair are probably fertilizing some grandma's apple tree somewhere.
I never got nystagmus like a lot of these kids do. Years after my change I could see as well as I did when I was a teenager. That’s the main freebie biomancy gets you - an unnaturally healthy body, even after enough experimental surgeries to make the most puritanical Brotherhood zealot sweat. My body just mutates around additions and edits, keeping me extremely alive whether I have any say in it or not. Pyromancers get to shoot fire out of their nose, hydromancers get to make the fountains dance, heiromancers get to write laws that reality itself has to obey. My only trick is being too alive to kill, among a couple of other fun things. But hey, if you’re gonna have one trick, not dying is a pretty good one to have, I think.
This kid has no clank at all other than his inhibitor, fitting with my observation that his vitae is weak as fuck, despite all his implants and injections. Red, and very low, like a lonely coal. His brain was barely holding itself together after basic slabbing, so there's no way he'd be able to tolerate any kind of optional features. Probably doesn't even have bone reinforcements. He's got maybe five years before he's a twisted-up pile of slime. If he doesn't kill himself or get executed first.
I smile and give him a little wave. He scowls at me, still trying to meet my eyes. Defiant. Cute.
From here, there's only two options, depending on his personality and how well that inhibitor is working. He'll either burn one of his last synapses to realize that I'm bigger and smarter than him by a pretty significant margin and go back to eating his sandwich like a nice little porkbrain, or decide against all logic that I'm a bit too uppity for his liking and I need to be taught a lesson. I'm about halfway through the line, so I figure I've got enough time to share some of my wisdom before lunch. I keep smiling at him.
Yep. That did it. The sandwich, which right now should be the most important thing in this guy's short little life, has been laid down. I am now his entire universe, and I couldn't be happier. He stands up from his table and starts stomping his way over to me. He's doing the thing all these gutter slabs do when they want to look extra scary and impressive*.* Squaring his shoulders, pushing his chest out, holding his chin slightly up, and flexing all his muscles at once, so his veins stand out under his skin like bridge cables. Personally, I always thought this pose made a guy look like an erection throwing a temper tantrum, but hey, what do I know? Maybe that's the point. I know I probably wouldn't try to tussle with a giant, throbbing, foul-tempered penis in work boots and coveralls. Who knows what kind of fluids you'd get on you?
Now he's within smelling distance. The delightful melange of grease, sweat, and testosterone wafts over me, and suddenly I'm reconsidering lunch. The rest of the line has done a curious thing, bending away from me to form a comfortable and distant semicircle. People around here know the drill - they're pretty much on autopilot. Once you see two trains crash head-on multiple times a day for a few years, you learn to just step calmly out of the shrapnel zone.
He lines up on me, about ten feet away. Close, but not so close that I could grab him. Smart. Not the first time this guy's taken exception to someone's behavior. His vitae is flaring, but it’s still sort of pitiful - just a kind of weak reddish glow, like a spoon accidentally left on a stove.
The palooka does his best to get me in his wiggly sights and grunts, “Got a problem, fuck?” His voice is hoarse, like sandpaper rasping over gravel. Probably smokes a lot of scrub to dampen the pain in his joints.
Most skinnies he does this to are probably wetting themselves by this point, so, considering he has somehow mistaken me for one, he probably expects me to do the same. Instead, I do what any respectful predator does when he meets one of his own kind, and show him my teeth. All fifty-eight of them.
I opt to leave the eloquence at the door, guessing this meat pie probably wouldn't appreciate it anyway. “Yeah. You're really, really ugly. You look like a butt. And you smell like what comes out of a butt. You should take a shower. Smelly.”
Okay, not exactly award-winning trash talk. But you try making your insults dashing and stylish using only words with two or less syllables. It's hard!
His pink face screws up in an expression of both pain and skull-popping fury, making his hairless head look like a wad of used chewing gum. His inhibitor is shocking him, telling him to cut it out. But he doesn't. He's angry enough to push through the pain.
I can understand that.
He lets the rage out of his chest with a roar, then puts his head down and charges me, very plainly trying to tackle me to the ground so he can turn my face into mince. I do what a slab almost never does.
Dodge.
This probably wouldn’t work in most other situations, because I’m huge and not very maneuverable, but so is this guy. I step around him as cool as you please, and he steams past me. He keeps going for a bit, but then catches on to the fact that he hasn't hit anything for a suspiciously long time, so he skids to a stop and whips around.
He's way past words at this point. He's getting shocked so bad I can see smoke coming from his implant. It'll blow if I don't tuck him into bed quick.
I don’t even need any magic for this. He’s making it way too easy.
Chunky charges again, but this time I don't move out of the way. I plant my back foot, then thrust my hand out right as he reaches me, mashing my palm right into his nose. He stops cold in his tracks with a sad little whimper, arms stretching toward me pitifully.
Fortunately the kid's got a weird tiny head, so I'm able to get a good grip on it. Thumb on his right ear, fingers wrapped nicely across his jawbone and temple. I lift him up a bit for leverage, then throw his head into the pavement like a bouncy ball. Being connected by a neck, the rest of his body follows suit. His chin makes a fun crack when it hits, and his neck bends at an angle that four out of five physicians probably don't recommend. He stops moving.
I bend down and wipe the sweat and spit off on the back of his shirt, then check his breathing. Feel around his neck vertebrae. His vitae is still there, but even dimmer. He's fine. Way sleepier than he was a minute ago, but alive. He'll wake up in half an hour wondering why everything above his shoulders feels like it got run over by a cargo train. And if he's lucky, he'll find he's gained some perspective on pointless violence, especially when aimed at one of the only guys in the city that outweighs him. If I'd been a Watchman, he'd have been sprayed with slabkiller and packed off to Sector Seventeen for recycling so fast he wouldn't even have time to notice how dead he was.
I stand up and give the line a coy smile and a wave. A couple nod at me in respect. I saunter slyly back over, and the guy I'd been ahead of lets me back in my spot.
Most gutter slabs are like a bottle of fizz in the back of a truck on a bumpy road. Over time, the pressure builds. The drugs, hormones, and supplemental brain tissue needed to integrate and coordinate the extra muscle result in a boiling pot of blind, directionless rage. For most, working hard all day doesn't let enough steam off. The extra starts to collect. With society saying that other ways of release aren't acceptable, while telling them they have to stay in line and put up with all the looks and comments, they reach a point where they pop. Usually all they do is smash up their own apartment, or fight it out with another slab in the same predicament.
But sometimes, when they're right on the edge, and another little kid screams at them like they're some kind of monster... they become one, for one horrible moment. And once you're a monster, you can never be anything else, ever again.
So, out of a sense of obligation to my dumb, angry brothers, I keep an eye out for the ones that look like they need a hard, thorough bit of percussive recalibration. I throw some goofy words at 'em, they fall for it, then I give 'em a nice whack on the head. They go to sleep for a bit, wake up with a few bruises, feel stupid, and remember what it is they need to be focusing on. Or at the very least they remember my fist in their face, which is enough to take the hot out of anyone's sauce, in my opinion. And then they stay out of trouble. Better for them to get a couple ouchies from a real monster than to cross that line themselves, I think.
I’m a mage, but I’m a slab too. It’s hard work being this distinctive and altruistic.
After about nine hundred years, I'm at the front of the line. I check the time. Almost noon. Yippee. I'm almost starting to feel it, too. The thought of quietly enjoying my meal at home and then taking a nap after the day I've had is almost enough to bring a tear to my eye. Metaphorically, that is. My tear ducts are cauterized shut.
The guy in front of me gets his order. It's a slab-sized sandwich, which I find strange, because it's almost the size of his thigh. But then I remember that skinnies can just slice a slab's sandwich like a cake and feed an entire family of four for a day or so. He's probably got kids at home. Pretty economical, when you think about it.
He tucks his monster meal under his arm and goes away, and I step up. I've got to take a knee in order to give my order, on account of how the shack's window only comes up to somewhere around the middle of my chest.
I peer into the greasy dollhouse and there's Gulder, the man himself, right in my face. I like Gulder. He serves enough slabs and weirdos every day that my awful mug suddenly appearing in his line of sight doesn't give him a heart attack. Everyone he sees, no matter what shape or sort, is just a receptacle to place a sandwich into, and I can't help but respect him for that. He's kind of a funny-looking fellow. On the short side, but borderline spherical from sampling the fruits of his labor, with no hair and a big black mustache like a push broom. From a distance he looks like two pink circles with a wide black line drawn through the top one.
He catches the green glint of my eyes and his caterpillar eyebrows go up. “Hey! This guy! Long time no see, Tiny! How you been? Keepin' outta trouble?”
See, the joke here is, Gulder calls me Tiny because I am, actually, a remarkably large person. An appellation that unexpectedly juxtaposes against the reality of the situation, in an example of what is sometimes referred to as “irony”. This is technically humor, but it's difficult to recognize after it's had its skull caved in with a lead pipe, wallet stolen, and left for dead in an alley somewhere. I'm so sorry, Humor. You deserved better.
I reply, “Oh, you know. I try to keep outta trouble, but trouble just can't keep outta me. It's 'cause I'm so handsome, y'see. Trouble just can't resist.”
He laughs. “Oh for sure. Pretty boy like you probably has more than his share of attention.” His smile melts off. “Hey look, thanks for cleaning up that mess over there. That one comes by pretty often, but he was starting to make me nervous. Times is hard enough without a puffed-up bully harassing my customers. Now he knows you come by here sometimes, maybe he'll cool it. I'm buying your lunch today.”
I wave a paw and scoff, because that's what you do in situations like this. “C'mon, it was all the work of twenty seconds. You probably could’ve given him a firm poke with a spatula and he would’ve fallen over, guy was as stable as a castle made out of cookies. It wasn't nothin'.”
He shakes his head and holds his hands up insistently. “It wasn't not nothin', champ. You went outta your way when you didn't have to. You spend twenty seconds showing a creep the inside of his own face for me, I spend twenty seconds making you lunch. Fair's fair, I insist.”
There's no point trying to shout him down. He's a Sector Seven man with a business that prints its own money, but I can tell he's not from here. Probably grew up in one of those Outer Ring slums where generosity is as rare as rain and being paid a favor is something that simply cannot be tolerated without swift, righteous vengeance. These cats are trained from childhood to treat an act of kindness like a declaration of war. Try to out-nice one of these slum knights and you'll both end up bankrupt.
“Alright, pal, I'll let you foot the bill this time. But only because I know you'll beat me up if I don't.”
He brandishes his spatula at me very seriously. “You bet your stitched-up ass I will. You want the deluxe with the works and extra mustard, right?”
“Yes I do, and you might as well throw in a basket of fried squash too, seeing as how you're paying and all.”
“You got it, champ. Be just a minute.”
About a minute later, I've got my bag, and I say my goodbye. I'm glad I stopped by. Not just because it's the best sandwich someone else's money can buy, but I also got to box a disaster waiting to happen. Can't have the riff-raff messing around and giving one of my favorite joints extra headache. And the whole possible prevention of senseless death thing, et cetera.
Now I gotta get back on the train. Hopefully I can get home before this bag gets cold, but who am I kidding, you could leave Gulder's stuff in a gutter for a week and it'd still be tastier than half the food in the city.
I step on the ostentatiously ornate Sector Seven platform, scan my ID, the alarm goes off, people give me dirty looks and clear out of the way, et cetera, et cetera. I don’t even care. I’ve got a greasy brown bag of heaven and they don’t, so there. This sandwich means I win today, citizens.
Interestingly, one person doesn’t clear off of the platform. He’s an old, old man, standing on the steel plates a distance from me. He’s a little bent, and holds a simple wooden cane. Very weathered, browned skin, like he’s worked in the sun his entire life. White beard, wild wispy hair like snow being blown off a mountaintop. I can’t get anything from his facial expression, he almost looks half asleep. I didn’t hear the system go off before me, so he’s not an arcanist. Maybe he didn’t hear the buzzer?
His vitae is… weird. You ever see diagrams of magnetic field lines? The two fields of concentric loops wrapping out and back from the poles? It looks like that, kind of. Long, lazy loops of gray energy, radiating out in steady pulses from the center of his chest and dissipating once they get a good ten or so feet away. There’s something else there, too. The lines closest to him have this sort of yellow shimmer that fades as they go out. The whole web smells… almost like ozone, or electrically charged metal.
Like I said, weird. Gray is a really rare color in vitae, like silver, gold, white, or black. And he can’t be an arcanist, even though that’s what this kind of weird pattern usually suggests. Unless he just didn’t scan his ID? He’s playing with fire, if that’s the case.
The train arrives, and I get on. The old man steps on too. He sits down gently on a seat toward the front of the car, and I stand a respectful distance away in the back. He crosses his spindly arms around his cane, leans his head forward, and falls asleep, apparently. Just like that, his long robe/coat thing wrapped about him like a blanket.
This isn’t totally unheard of. Most people get off the platform when an arcanist scans in, but a very few just ignore it and get on anyway. Something tells me this dusty tomcat isn’t exactly late for anything, so he must be too old to care. It’s the first time I’ve had any company on the train in months.
I’d like to talk to him, but I’ll let him sleep. Far be it from me to wreck up an old-timer’s rest. He’s probably earned it.

[this story has over 30 posts now, which you can find through my reddit profile. hundreds and hundreds of pages of ol' Featherlight. and i update pretty much every week, so you can look forward to more ♥]
[you can read this story on Royal Road too, if that's the kind of thing you're into. reviews would be greatly helpful for a new guy on the scene ♥]
[if you think this story is good enough to pay for, why not flip me a tip? i'd appreciate it ♥]
[and thanks for reading ♥]
submitted by CadaverCommander to HFY [link] [comments]

505 books to read in quarantine for people who are bored af

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Kasimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to teenagers [link] [comments]

GTA VI Credible Leak ?

UPVOTE THIS POST SO IT DOES NOT GET BURIED ... *** FOLLOW ME TO GET MORE INFORMATION IN THE FUTURE.
UPDATED WITH TRACKLIST AND RADIO STATIONS
here is my ID badge that i use to get in and out of work. ( Name and picture is blurred for my protection.) date 2019-2020.
https://imgur.com/a/eenWmAR
Everyone has been waiting, a credible leak for Grand Theft Auto 6. I will not be stating my name or anything, this is a personal throwaway account, But I do work at Rockstar Games. This next addition to the title will be keeping the tradition of roman numerals, ( GTA VI ) but I will often refer to it as GTA 6, to make things easier.
be sure to read everything, as I have taken the risk and time to leak a lot of vital information.
First off I’d like to state that all previous leaks about GTA 6 is a hoax. All of the leaks regarding GTA 6 taking place in any other area than Vice City, is a hoax.
I will be breaking down the characters, storyline, and more.
Grand Theft Auto VI is designed to be the most developed video game in history, and redefine open sand box games, letting the player fully immerse in the world and storyline.
In Grand Theft Auto 6 the game will take place in Vice City, but the previous storyline leaks etc, is all fake. The plot is completely different,. The game will host 3 protagonists, one being a middle aged white man named Johnathon Brooks, but is often referred to as John. John is going thru a mid-life crisis, and lives on the returning area called Starfish Island. John essentially is a life long career criminal, and exposes the player to a new crime element, fraud. John was born in Carcer City, and moved to Vice City at age 17, after running away from his foster parents, not much is known about his previous life before then, except he was in a very poor family.
John got into the fraud game in the early 2000’s, and he is 38 in game. he earned his money thru many fraudulent activities like credit card fraud, bank fraud, and did a few small bank jobs, and laundered his money with his own car wash business. He lives in a $1.8m mansion that he bought with his illicit gains, and the FIB are on to him. He borrows money from the local gang in Little Haiti, where fraud is very prevalent, and he starts getting back into his older habits to pay off the gang. The FIB notices this, and he ends up doing dirty work for the FIB, in order to keep his freedom.
The second character is Samuel “Shotta” Stevens, who is a member of the Haitian gang. He is a black, Haitian based character with more character development, than Franklin from GTA 5. He is 26 in game. The game also focuses more on crime, and the gang element. The player will experience the brutal reality of the gang life in Vice City, in the slums of Little Haiti, from loan sharking and repossessing the unreliable clients, to brokering the sales, that being kilos of cocaine, for the South American Cartel. Samuel lives in a Section 8 apartment, in the Little Haiti Neighborhood with his grandmother, Amy.
Samuel just wants to move out of the hood, but loves the gang lifestyle, and this gets him caughtup in the FIB drama with John. The FIB cuts him a deal also, if he can snitch out his gang, which the player can choose to cooperate, or refuse. This will change the storyline of Samuel dramatically.
If you choose Option A: Snitch on the gang, You will snitch on the gang and work with John, who will show you the ropes of Fraud, and you both will defraud the bank of Schlongberg Sachs, commit multiple heists, and become a protege of John. Or of course you can choose, Option B: Refuse. Refusing will make Samuel a target of the FIB, and this causes him to gain more respect from his gang. The respect system from San Andreas is back, but new and improved. Samuel will expand his gang operations from Little Haiti, all the way to the Vice Keys, and beyond.
The Third Character is a man named Xavier Gonzalez. Xavier is a latino man born in Vice City, he is 40 years old, and a cocaine kingpin. He lives in Downtown Vice City in his lavish $1.5m penthouse. Xavier is friends with John from the beginning of the story. Xavier is apart of the story no matter what option you choose, providing cocaine to John to sell, OR, Providing cocaine to both John AND Samuel, to sell together, and to strengthen the gangs funds. The gang system is similar to Red Dead Redemption 2’s system, and also has elements of GTA San Andreas. Xavier is also tied in directly to the nightclub business as well, having stakes in the returning Malibu Club, now run by the Jimenez Family, a latino Mafia, who has ties directly to the South American Cartel.
Each Character has a different personality and lifestyle, and will be a exceptional experience for the player. Former characters from past GTA’s will be making appearances. Luis WILL be returning, being a manager of the Malibu Club, Stranger and Freaks missions are returning with a more in depth story for every one of them, and Michael De Santa and his wife, Amanda, will be returning also, living in a beach house, although their children will not make any appearances. The both do not play a VITAL part in the storyline, but will have stranger and freaks missions for any character, with all different outcomes. For example, passing by the state penitentiary, you may just recognize Lamar Davis, in a bluish grey jumpsuit, embellished with a pair of handcuffs wrapped around his wrists, demanding for a ride.
The map of GTA VI, will be bigger than GTA V and RDR2 combined, having several counties, having Vice City, based on Miami, the Vice Keys, based on the Florida Keys, The Everglades, based on the swampy Everglades in Florida. The game will also feature Orlando, which is named Corlado, and Tampa, named as Gulf Shore City, but downsized a bit. The game will feature sprawling countryside outside of Vice City and Corlado, with countryside towns, named Canisville, Centura, and Sentinel Point, along with towns along the Vice Keys. There is an Air Force Base, based of off Eglin Air Force Base, named Fort Sentinel. The Ocean is the Atlantic Ocean, with more shipwrecks to discover, plants and animals, and more. The game itself has as many animals as RDR2, and the player can hunt if they choose, although this is just a more of a minigame. Vigilante Missions will be back, along with Taxi Missions.
Character Customization will be better, from the belt on your waist, to the socks on your feet. Choose to your liking of luxury watches, rings, chains, earrings, featuring plain jane, to diamonds and rubies, emeralds, and more. Belts can be worn along with hightops, to lowtops and boots, and dress shoes. Pantlegs can be tucked into the footwear you choose, if the option is available. Tattoos will be back, along with hair customization. John is white so he can tan, or be sunburned, and the core system from RDR 2 is back aswell.
Tattoos will feature opacity and can also fade over time. You will be able to adjust the size of the tattoo. It will be able to be placed on over 10 different area of the body depending the size.
Since the core system is back, you will have to also bathe, to stay clean, otherwise you may notice changes in your cores.
You will have to eat to replenish cores, so you can cook in your safehouse, or go eat out in a restaurant, whether it be fast food or upscale. All characters can have relationships with women, similar to GTA 4 and GTA San Andreas. You will be able to buy extra safehouses around the map, and the amount of vehicles will be the same amount that are in GTA Online, and more. Every vehicle will be returning, and first person mode will be more enhanced, with more realistic vehicle interiors to immerse the player into every aspect of the game. South America will not be apart of the game, only Vice City and surrounding Areas.
Skills from GTA V is also being integrated back, along with exercising, to boost strength. Agility is a new added skill, and Strength will affect how hard you punch, kick, or melee in general.
Special Abilities so far, will not be coming back. This may be tweaked before release, but if they return, it will not be a major part of the game.
Car Customization is more advanced, different leather trims can be changed colors, along with wood trims and marble trims. You can add satellite radio, which lets you listen to radio stations in Los Santos, and Liberty City, but so far there is only two stations from each of those cities. You can also listen to all the radio stations across the counties. Neon is back, new spoilers and liveries as well, Along with different colors of tint. Subwoofers will be a standard upgrade as well.
Los Santos Customs is gone, and Pay and Spray is back, along with Viceland Kustomz, and Sentinel Bike Shop. You can also modify certain parts at the car dealerships.
The drug dealing system from GTA: China Town Wars is also returning, but a bit revamped. This is where the post office system comes in, from RDR2. Pounds of Marijuana sourced from Los Santos delivered by mail, to a post office near you. From weed to tabs of LSD, all the way to meth, heroin, and cocaine, you can reap major profits.
Casinos will be returning as well, one being a resort, others being small-time casinos. You will be able to rent a room in the casino and resort. The casino is named as the Malibu Casino and Resort.
Gunplay is improved with new realistic sounds. Interiors are just as detailed as GTA V or RDR2, if not more, I’d say. The insurance system from GTA Online will be integrated into GTA VI’s story mode, so losing a vehicle will not happen.
There is an abundance of new and old activities, that being over 50 strangers and freaks missions, drug supplying, or drug running, similar to GTA TBOGT’s drug missions. You can hunt, as stated before, but is more of a minigame than a money maker. You can fish as well, as fishing is a very popular sport, in modern day Florida.
There will be four strip clubs scattered around the map, one of them named Vanilla Unicorn South East, which is owned by Trevor Phillips, who is planned to make a cameo, only to be featured in a cutscene so far.
Nightclubs as I stated before, will be a thing. There will be 3 nightclubs, where you can take part in a few activities, like dancing, where you can meet your date in game, or drinking and smoking. Expect SOLOMUN, and BLACK MADONNA to return. You will see in game appearances of them DJing in the nightclubs. No other DJ’s will return.
Bounty hunting will not be a thing, but dirty work for the FIB throughout the story will be similar. Pool and bowling is returning, along with player skills, exercise and working out also is a thing, as stated above earlier.
Convenience stores and gas stations will feature many products you can purchase. Snacks, that being Phat chips, (different flavors yield more health and core restoration) candy bars, ( EgoChaser, Meteorite, Zebra Bar, and more) drinks, (E Cola, Sprunk,) Alcohol, (Pisswasser, Champagne, Logger) Redwood cigarettes, and cigars. The stores will be setup similar to RDR2’s store system. You can rob the stores, and also start a protection racket, and extort them.
Pharmacys will be in the game, to purchase portable med kits, or you can rob the pharmacy for drugs and money.
The way you eat can also affect your character’s health, and weight. Similar to GTA San Andreas’s system.
Merryweather will return, but won’t have the same presence as it did in GTA V. Merryweather ends up not being able to operate on U.S. soil, and goes out of business as a hit is put on Don Percival, by one of the returning characters from GTA V.
An advanced parkour system is integrated as well, similar to GTA IV’s.
Gun stores will be prevalent as this is based off of Florida. The homeless man who found the diamonds, from GTA TBOGT will also make an appearance as a gun store owner, as he has proceeded to purchase and start a gun shop in the area of South Vice Beach.
The black market for weapons is featured in this game as well, similar to fences in RDR2. You can also craft bombs/projectiles if you have learned to.
Realism is a goal of this game, without being too overwhelming. Guns and weapons will need to be cleaned. If you shoot a gun, you will smell of gun powder, this may be noticed by civilians or police officers, and they will make comments about it. If you have not bathed, you may just get absurd insults slurred at you. If you have blood stained on you, and you smell of blood, people may give you weird looks, or may just make a call to the local Law Enforcement.
As for those who DM me or ask about Strangers and Freaks, or mysteries and riddles, the paranormal world will be featured in GTA VI. You may encounter serial killers, or creepy sightings in dreary areas. Strangers and freaks will all have its own unique storyline.
The weather system is IMPROVED SIGNIFICANTLY aswell. Hurricanes do take place, but only during certain parts of the storyline, and floods may occur in marshland areas and anywhere away from mainland.
Melee Combat system is based off of strength, and Agility, which is a new skill, as stated above, and is improved heavily. Hand combat is influenced by strength and agility. Based on how hard you hit the opponent, you may bruise them, and bruise yourself. The chainsaw is returning as well. The limbs and gore is back from RDR2
Dialogue System from GTA San Andreas and RDR2 is back, and improved, with different responses every time.
GPS and Navigation System will be improved, showing the quickest routes, from alleyways to the freeway. Every street will have a name, and the GPS voice from GTA IV is returning as well, get ready to hear “Turn Left in 500 yards, Bing Bong.” Planes will have autopilot, and you can fly to each city with plane tickets, or on your own.
Driving mechanics will be similar to GTA IV’s, but combined with the smoothness of GTA V’s mechanics. Damage to the vehicle will be more detailed then ever, featuring airbag damage as well. EVERY Vehicle will have its own selected weight, and handling, to improve the player’s experience.
Six star wanted level is back, with FIB being the 6th star. There is multiple law enforcement agencies. VCPD, GSCPD, CPD, SPPD, Highway Patrol, FIB, IAA, Viceland State Patrol, as well as the NOOSE. You will not be shot by cops for just staring at them.
Being arrested results in you serving time, similar to RDR 1’s Jail time mechanic, showing you all of your charges while you sit in a cell. The first time you get arrested it will show your character being booked, and you will have to take a mugshot and be fingerprinted. Depending on the county or city you’ve been arrested in, you will be known to local law enforcement and even law abiding citizens, depending on how severe your charges are.
Random events are more realistic than ever. depending on the wanted level you’ve attained, there is a system similar to the bounty system of RDR2. The more crimes you’ve commited that have gained attention of law enforcement, you have a chance of getting your hotel room getting kicked in by noose, your safe house getting staked out by undercover FIB, even being pulled over if you have commited a number of crimes in the same vehicle. You may witness muggings, or even be mugged yourself. You will encounter situations with homeless people to the rich and famous, with all different outcomes.
Real Estate as stated before, will be available to all three characters. Businesses will be available, illicit and legal, from businesses to launder cash for the gang, to illicit businesses like credit fraud rings, to counterfeit cash.
Safe houses will be available as well. A penthouse in Corlado, a modern mansion on Starfish Island, a beach house on Ocean Beach, a small quaint house in Canisville, a traditional house in Gulf Shore City, a vacation-style home in the Vice Keys, to small apartments in small towns like Centura or Sentinel Point. Each character will be able to purchase any of these properties, but it will be tied to just the one character that purchased it.
Hotels and Motels will also be available to rent rooms and bathe in, one being the Gulf Shore motel, a dingy motel room for cheap, perfect for someone wanting a cheap stay. The Malibu Casino and Resort near Vice Beach, a 5 star luxury stay, with a two-story penthouse with a jacuzzi the player can bathe in, with views of Vice Beach, and the nearby Ocean Beach. There is 4 hotels and 2 motels scattered across the map, each with unique interiors and different amenities.
Purchasing vehicles you can enter a dealership, or purchase online and have it delivered to a garage. Pegasus Concierge is returning. Certain stolen vehicles will have trackers, and will not be able to be modified, same as GTA V.
The stock market is also returning, BAWSAQ and VLSM ( Vice Land Stock Market ) and can reap heavy profits as well.
Time goes by: This game is set in 2017-2019. Times will change thruout, buildings will be completed as they were in RDR2, radio stations will not play all of the music in the tracklist at first. Instead it will play newer music thruout the storyline. You will still hear older and newer songs too after completion.
Character customization is not just clothing, tattoos, jewelry and hair customization. You can also purchase 3 different phone models. an iFruit phone, based on the iPhone Xr, a Badger phone, or a Whiz Wireless. You will also be able to purchase ringtones, as you were able to do in GTA IV. You can also purchase an iFruit watch, based on the apple watch, which you can take calls on, if you change your settings.
Depending on how rough you play, clothing can wear and tear. Examples: jumping out of a moving vehicle, falling off/on rocks, tripping on certain props.
As stated above, NPC’s will notice the clothing you wear, the way you look or smell, the car you drive, and the jewelry you wear, and will make comments on it.
Crouching will be back, the same as RDR2, and the cover system is nearly the exact same cover system as RDR2.
ALSO Expect a Special Edition, AND Collector’s Edition, similar to RDR2.
The game is set in the summer of 2017 to 2019 as the storyline proceeds. This game WILL BE PS5 Exclusive, for the first month. The in-game experience is like no other, PS5 also has a new controller design as well. It is projected to not release until later 2020, AFTER holiday season BUT MAY BE DELAYED. I have broken down the storyline, key elements of the game, and if anyone has anymore questions I will be happy to answer. I know so much about this game as I’ve been working on it since the start, and I’m not afraid to get in trouble, as this is a throwaway.
I will not be responding to negative comments, claiming this is fake, because I will not waste my time with non-believers, only true questions.
all content is confirmed unless it has been mentioned by me to not be officially confirmed already, and anything may be scrapped before release as cut content, but is unlikely
*PLEASE UPVOTE. I do not want my effort and the risks I am taking to go to waste. I want this to not get buried. *
if you have questions or WANT MORE? (screenshots or photos as proof, radio stations, confirmed tracklists or more) Send Me A Chat.
You may see songs from previous games, as Rockstar may have the licenses still, or has renewed them.
CONFIRMED SONGS, AND RADIO STATIONS.
Satellite Radio: Liberty City
Beat 102.7- Hosted By DJ Whoo Kid
Beat 102.7 Logo- https://imgur.com/a/To0Wi8c
Liberty Rock Radio- Hosted By Iggy Pop
LRR Logo- https://imgur.com/a/5dCcVwB
Satellite Radio:
Radio Los Santos- Hosted By BigBoy
Radio Los Santos Logo- https://imgur.com/a/XUqjEed
Los Santos Rock Radio- Hosted By Kenny Loggins
Los Santos Rock Radio Logo- https://imgur.com/a/KxkMMd6
LOCAL RADIO STATIONS
NightRide FM Hosted By Kavinsky
NightRide FM Logo- https://imgur.com/a/bb0hXDP
Corlado’s Hottest Jams 103.7 Hosted By Feliciá Williams and DJ Diamondz
CHJ 103.7 Logo- https://imgur.com/a/eWauMMj
V-Rock FM Hosted By Couzin Ed
V-Rock FM Logo- https://imgur.com/a/9zQUsAE
Vice City’s Retro Mix , 104.7 Fm Hosted By Fernando Martinez
VCRM 104.7 FM Logo- https://imgur.com/a/wdrjsLH
Vice City Classic Hip Hop Hosted By DJ slick slim
Vice City Classic Hip Hip Logo- https://imgur.com/a/f859okr
Viceland’s Country Radio (VLCR) Hosted By Derrick Jones
VLCR Logo- https://imgur.com/a/VwZ1jw3
GSC-EDM FM ( Gulf Shore City EDM Fm ) Hosted By Gulf Shore City FM.
GSC-EDM FM Logo- https://imgur.com/a/2zAlvsR
The Sunrise Fm ( Reggae music ) Hosted By Marshall Peters
The Sunrise Fm Logo- https://imgur.com/a/ea639SV
Vice Rap Radio ( VRR ) ( modern florida rap ) Hosted By DJ Josué Da Kidd
Vice Rap Radio Logo- https://imgur.com/a/F6qeX0U
The Groove 109.2 Hosted By Vaughn Harper
The Groove 109.2 Logo- https://imgur.com/a/vuon14i
Baila Ahora Radio (modern spanish station) Hosted By Amada Abrantes
Baila Ahora Radio Logo- https://imgur.com/a/TpBFTTd
Interesante Musica Radio ( modern and old spanish music ) Hosted By Selená Martinez * Los Hermanos Rosario, La Dueña Del Swing * los reyes del merengue, El Baile del Beeper - Versión Merengue * Celia Cruz, La Vida Es Un Carnaval * INDIA, Marc Anthony, Vivir Lo Nuestro * Felipe Muñiz, Marc Anthony, Deje de Amar * Ivy Queen, Dime * Monchy and Alexandra, Alexandra
Musica de Clásico FM ( Salsa ) Hosted By Pedro Simmóns
Flash FM ( 2000’s and 90’s pop) Hosted By DJ Toni
Flash FM Logo- https://imgur.com/a/iWIYd8s
Ocean Beach Classics FM (80’s synth pop) Hosted By DJ Teri
OBC FM Logo- https://imgur.com/a/5C1JVGJ
The Wave 103 (Slow/Vocal Synthwave + Indie Synth) Hosted By Adam First, Trish Camden
The Wave 103 Logo- https://imgur.com/a/Ku0amCT
Centura County Country Hits ( newer country ) Hosted By Rick Hanson
Centura County Country Hits Logo- https://imgur.com/a/wppVRMu
The Keys Rock Radio ( mix of rock) Hosted By Gerald Ritsky
The Keys Rock Radio Logo- https://imgur.com/a/JpWpA8x
Viceland Lithium Radio ( Hardcore Rock, Heavy Metal ) ( VLLR ) Hosted By VLLR.
VLLR Logo- https://imgur.com/a/wOsEIlj
Trap House Radio ( Trap Rap ) Hosted By DJ BlueBandz
Trap House Radio Logo- https://imgur.com/a/lyG3FGA
Anarchy Radio 98.5 FM ( Alt Rock, Punk) Hosted By Jason Lavigne
Chatterbox Vice City Talk Radio
CBVCTR Logo- https://imgur.com/a/FKko1f1
CTR Corlado Talk Radio
-host, Lazlow - Fernando Martinez
Viceland News Network VLNN
VLNN Logo- https://imgur.com/a/yaBucdY
Host- Vanessa Hopkins, Weazel News. - Updates on weather and Weazel News
Ignore this below.
Legal Disclaimer: This post is not affiliated with Rockstar Games or Take-Two Interactive, or its subsidiaries, In any way, shape or form, and should be taken as satirical. Ignore this below.
Legal Disclaimer: This post is not affiliated with Rockstar Games or Take-Two Interactive, or its subsidiaries, In any way, shape or form, and should be taken as satirical.
Along with the No phone, No photos policy, It will be very difficult to get OFFICIAL screenshots. Here is a official, accurate sketch of the GTA VI Minimap and cores design
https://imgur.com/a/ghyoRb4
Here is the sketch of the mini map on computer.
https://imgur.com/a/D0Qj0EP
I will be uploading more sketches soon.
FOLLOW ME FOR MORE INFORMATION COMING SOON
Here’s my Rockstar badge / ID. it is dirty, apologies. The rockstar logo, imprinted on the card itself, along with my photo, blurred out, my name below it, and the expiration date, years 2019-2020. this is only an ID to get into the building. since i have released a bit of proof, stop spreading misinformation
https://imgur.com/a/eenWmAR
You can still trust my leak, but here is a legal disclaimer so I cannot be targeted.
Ignore this below.
-legal disclaimer. this is fictional and not proven, this post is not associated with taketwo or rockstar games in any way, shape, or form.
submitted by aFloatingPineapple to u/aFloatingPineapple [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine If You’re Bored and Kinda Like Books (in No Particular Order)

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to cleanagers [link] [comments]

D1000 rooms for Draven Manor

A haunted mansion with a twist, it was touched by the shrouded king, an inter-dimensional being of darkness, now the mansion acts as a pocket dimension with seemingly infinite rooms, and phases through time and space, having been photographed before it was technically created....
Feel free to throw in as many horror references as physically possible.
  1. Foyer
  2. Parlor
  3. Anteroom
  4. Wardrobe
  5. Balcony
  6. Study
  7. Master Bedroom
  8. Nursery'
  9. Graveyard
  10. Boneyard
  11. Bathroom
  12. Washroom
  13. Conservatory
  14. Storage
  15. Kitchen
  16. Dining Room
  17. Ballroom
  18. Laundry Room
  19. Butler's Room
  20. Hidden Room
  21. Fortune Teller's Room
  22. Mirror Room
  23. Projection Room
  24. Billiards Room
  25. Courtyard
  26. Rec Room
  27. Nana's Room
  28. Tea Room
  29. Astral Room
  30. Observatory
  31. Twins' Room
  32. Safari Room
  33. Ceramics Studio
  34. Armory
  35. Clockwork Room
  36. Telephone Room
  37. Art Studio
  38. Sitting Room
  39. Guest Room
  40. Sealed Room
  41. Well
  42. Secret Altar
  43. Pipe Room
  44. Cold Storage
  45. Breaker Room
  46. Cellar
Ken_Nt
  1. Sauna
  2. Indoor pool
  3. Broom closet
Keystoneway
  1. Sewing room
  2. Library
  3. Boiler room
  4. Surgery room
  5. Greenhouse
  6. Pantry
  7. Morgue
  8. Exercise room
  9. Room just for a certain kind of pet (Google 'tarantula room')
  10. Game room
  11. Cell
  12. Woodshop
  13. Swimming pool
  14. Panic room
  15. Padded cell
  16. Torture chamber
  17. Alchemy lab
  18. Doll room
  19. Elevator
  20. Darkroom (like for developing photographs)
  21. Mail room
Mythgirl
  1. The lotion room: Dozens if glass shelves hold hundreds bottles of lotion. Footsteps are muffled against the leather floor. The walls are made of living skin hidden behind thin wood panels which fold out of the way like shutters.
  2. The crime scene: A manikin lies motionless inside of a chalk outline. The decor is that of a seedy motel. Flies buzz lazily, crawling in and out of the the sink’s plumbing. Upon inspection a few strands of hair are found in the drain. If you pull them they slide out, slimy and damp, attached to a piece of scalp.
  3. The powder donut: a room with opulent furnishings. Overstuffed chairs and sofa’s welcome visitors. If sat upon, they release a white cloud. Poison? Mold? Anthrax? Powdered sugar? Mites? Only time will tell the effects.
  4. Abandoned room: all the furniture is covered in sheets. If lifted, nothing but dust is found under the cover.
  5. Throne Room
  6. Child’s bedroom
  7. Child’s playroom
  8. Tinkerer’s workshop
  9. Model train room (or world equivalent)
  10. Wood working room
  11. Warehouse storeroom
  12. Dangerous material storage
  13. Pastry kitchen (completely separate from normal kitchen)
  14. Smoke room (for curing meat)
  15. Walk-in closet full of fancy costumes
  16. Emergency supply room (full of water, fire suppressant, weapons, gas masks, and similar. Think prepper)
  17. Room of magically useless curiosities
  18. Statue room (full of statue figures)
  19. Portrait room (full of portraits)
  20. Sculpture room (not figures, more artistic)
  21. Room of stone where everything is made of marble
  22. Golden room (painted or real you decide)
  23. Peacock room (like the famous irl one, beautiful room that was decorated to match the gorgeous painting of peacocks that spans the entirety of the wall and ceiling
  24. Phoenix room (see peacock room, but Phoenix themed.)
  25. Mirrored room
  26. Cozy sitting room (fireplace and hot coco with marshmallows at the ready)
  27. Window room (each window shows a completely different view)
  28. Room filled with sand
  29. Bathroom with dead woman in bathtub (the shining)
Edit: more stuff
  1. Junk room
  2. Tower room
  3. Room of illusion (everyone inside appears to grow either horns or wings, mess with your party as you choose)
  4. Pentagram room
  5. Laboratory
  6. Medical wing
  7. Furnace room
  8. Crematorium
  9. Mausoleum
  10. Embalming room
  11. Padded cell
  12. Suspiciously Empty room
  13. Tavern
  14. Classy bar (like a five star hotel)
  15. Maid’s quarters
  16. Swimming pool
  17. Inhabited swimming pool
  18. Locker room
  19. Movie/play theater
  20. Backstage
  21. Loft
  22. Crawl space
  23. Call center
  24. Scroll room
  25. Interior of Pyramid
  26. Exterior of pyramid inside larger room
  27. Mummy’s Tomb
  28. Automaton room
  29. Trash compactor
  30. Control room
  31. Incubator room
  32. Apothecary
  33. Pharmacy
  34. Waiting room
  35. Stables
  36. Gymnasium
  37. Weight room
  38. Sewing room
  39. Glass cube room (think cabin in the woods)
  40. Rustic Cabin room
  41. Basement
  42. Earthquake room (you feel an earthquake with inside it, but the rest of the house in undisturbed)
  43. Room full of Fragile vases
  44. Room full of cut Flowers
  45. Room with one bloody handprint in the center of the floor
  46. Room with bed (bed has rumpled sheets and is warm to the touch)
  47. Room full of cats
  48. Room with axe stuck in door
  49. Room with typewriter and desk, papers with gibberish written on them are scattered over the floor
  50. Freezer
  51. Room with walls that are made of tree bark. Red sap oozes from it when touched. Smells of pine and mold. Mushrooms grow in patches
  52. Room full of moldy dead rats (perhaps an later temporal space of the live rat room, may seem eerily familiar if they have encountered the living rat room first)
  53. Living rat room: Room of food barrels, when disturbed, rats pour fourth (perhaps an earlier temporal space of the dead rat room, may seem eerily familiar if they have encountered the dead rat room first)
  54. Cheese room
SuperNes

  1. Masonry workshop
  2. Museum
  3. Reliquary
  4. Barracks
  5. Stables
  6. Menagerie
Worldofideas
  1. Attic
  2. Boiler Room
  3. Catacombs
  4. Coach House
  5. Darkroom (photography)
  6. Furnace room
  7. Mad Science Laboratory
  8. Music Room
  9. Root Cellar
  10. Safe Room / Panic Room
  11. Sub Basement
  12. Summoning Room
  13. Torture Chamber
  14. Walk in Closet
Vinvladro
  1. Torture Room
  2. Wine cellar with wine press and some bloody rags scattered around the press
  3. Brewery
  4. Golem Workshop
More of my own ideas
178: Dinosaur Containment Units
179: Submarine Bay
180: Western Bank
181: Underground Temple
182: Puppet Theater
183: Agency
184: 80's Room
185: Criminal Hideout
186: Comic Fan's Room
187: Wizarding World Room
188: Space Station
189: Pirate Ship
190: DnD Room
191: Escape Room
192: Slasher's Collection
193: Art Cabin
194: Antidote Lab
195: Motel Rooms
196: Board Game Room
197: Wax Museum
198: Casino
199: Gore Fountain
200: Murderous Little Girl's Room
201: King's Crypt
202: Lurker's Room
203: Skeleton Band Room
204: Spider's Nest
205: Witch's Kitchen
206: Ghoul Stairs
207: Mad Scientist's Collection
208: Library of Spells
209: Gothic Dining Room
210: Fog Room
211: Potion Shop
212: Bone Web
213: Redneck's Shed
214: Indoor Beach
215: Hellish Labyrinth
216: Wedding Chapel
217: Ballet Stage
218: Fun House
219: Castle Gallery
220: Moon Pavilion
221: Psycho Cinema
222: Suburban Garden
223: Racist Club
224: Bloody Playroom
225: VRcade
226: Tribal Arts
227: Robotics Room
228: Funerary Storage
229: Slasher's Wardrobe
230: Ski Lounge
231: Vampire's Crypt
232: Seaside Knick Knack Shop
233: Tree Farm
234: Mutant Bunker
235: Demonic Book-Building Workshop
236: Alien Nest
237: Medieval Gallery
238: Scarecrow Shed
239: Cabin Cellar
240: Room in Tarps
241: Dog's Room
242: Puppet Workshop
243: Candy Shop
244: Post-Apocalyptic Room
245: Christmas Hall
246: Fleece Room
247: Playground
248: Giant Cake
249: Cannery
250: Room Under Construction
251: Moth Light
252: Fiendish Kennels
253: Sheep Tents
254: Alien Court
255: Railway
256: Bunny Bridge
257: Funeral Home
258: Squatter's Warehouse
259: Algae Pond
260: Civil War Battlefield
261: Dollhouse
262: Vampire Party Hall
263: Daughter's Crypt
264: Doghouse
265: Writer's Room
266: Cloning Lab
267: Electrocution Chamber
268: Corpse Pit
269: Boarded Room
270: Snake Island
271: Fossil Cave
272: Arctic Crater
273: Surgical Theater
274: Chemical Silo
275: Psychic Test Center
276: Spider Den
277: Old Aviary
278: Black Magic Strip Club
279: Witch's Warehouse
280: Ancient Egyptian Tomb
281: Pumpkin House
282: Giant Snow Globe
283: Deer Cult
284: Giant's Home
285: Snake Pit
286: Reanimation Lab
287: Reptilian City
288: Drinking Lodge
289: Twin Girls' Room
290: Ancient Altar
291: Asylum Cell Block
292: Vomit Covered Room
293: Time Machine
294: Shaman's Tent
295: Locker Room with steroids in one of the lockers
296: Room of Shadows
297: Elder Brain
298: Giant Board Game
299: Dark Shed
300: Revolutionary Exhibit
301: Limacology Labs
302: Broken Stables
303: Gator Shack
304: Ant's Nest
305: Apehouse
306: Rich Cat Lover's Room
307: Insect House
308: Tengu Shrine
309: Rodents Room
310: Inside a Genie's Lamp
311: Insect Study
312: Reptile Room
313: Parasite Storeroom
314: Athena's Shrine
315: Frog Library
316: Ruined Date
317: Gladiatorial Arena
318: Simulated Haunted House
319: Gorilla House
320: Death Cult
321: A laboratory that looks as though people left in a hurry...
322: A medical room that seems as though someone died here.
323: Japanese VHS Enthusiast's Apartment
324: Prison of the Deformed
325: Room of Stretchers
326: Oni's Hut
327: Mongolian Tents
328: Room of Cloaks
329: Gothic Party
330: Pteradactyl Enclosure
331: Carnivorous Greenhouse
332: Rabid Kennels
333: Space Hangar
334: Hatchet Shed
335: Indoor Swamp
336: Room of Smoke
337: Old Man's Room
338: Murdered Child's Room
339: Weaboo's Room
340: Snuff Studio
341: Warlord's Tent
342: Gamer's Parlor
343: Tentacle Pools
344: Toll Bridge
345: Headhunter's Camp
346: Sugar Mill
347: "Vaginal Torture" Room
348: Dermatology Room
349: Volcanic Room
350: Nile Tomb
351: Farmer's Children's' Room
352: Infant's Play Room
353: Room of Flames
354: Innsmouth Pawn
355: Rabbit Room
356: Maternity Ward
357: Steampunk Workshop
358: Minotaur's Labyrinth
359: Goth Girl's Room
360: Serkhet's Shrine
361: Irish Washerwoman's Room
362: Wild West Shooting Gallery
363: Medusa's Garden
364: Room of Decapitated Heads
365: Toxic Barrel Storeroom
366: Alien Specimens Room
367: Fishing Shack
368: Sushi Farm
369: Shark Bay
370: Alien Plant Cave
371: Butchery
372: Exterminator's Room
373: Elliot's Room
374: Magic Theater
375: Pirate Ship
376: Surgical Bay
377: Viking Long Ship
378: Hag's Barn
379: Vampire Garden
380: Enchantress' Room
381: Mutant Bug Arena
382: Clown Toyshop
383: Underworld Gate
384: Arctic Labs
385: Padded Cell (Someone escaped from it)
386: Gym Supplies
387: Virginial Garden
388: College Library
389: Sex Room filled with Plushies for some unknown reason...
390: Weed Farm
391: Security Office
392: Horror Movie Studio
393: Gadgets Lab
394: Office Cubicles
395: Break Room
396: Superstitious Woman's Room
397: Sexy Nurse's Office
398: Rest Stop
399: Room of Old Dolls
400: Reveren's Room
401: Parental Room
402: Sex Dungeon
403: Escape Room
404: Hoard
405: A.I. Room
406: Technovault
407: Staffroom
408: Ritual Room
409: Hellish Stripclub
410: Criminal's Apartment
411: Military Kennels
412: Femme Fatale's Room
413: Brine Reef
414: Decrepit Police Office
415: Skeletal Ballroom
416: Murder Circus
417: Wolf Den
418: Sulfuric Pit
419: Tribal Room with Snakes
420: Zombie Outpost
421: Law Firm
422: Decrepit Building
423: Creepy Old Orphanage
424: Vampiric Enforcer's Room
425: Sorority Room
426: Leprechaun's Cave
427: Death Row
428: Ghost Finder's Lab
429: Sunken Ruins
430: Faith Chapel
431: Convent
432: Vampire Hunter's Armory
433: Tickling Chamber
434: Fishing Boat Dock
435: Terror Chamber
436: Room of Coffins
437: Agentry
438: Widow's Bedroom
439: Sleepy Hollow Gallery
440: Prisoner's Row
441: Occultic Library
442: Sunken Spire
443: Well of Souls
444: Tomb of the Pharoah's
445: Blood Chamber
446: Pit of the Giant Wolf
447: Victorian Tea Room
448: Gothic Museum
449: Satanic Church
450: Cedar Cabin
451: Halloween Shop
452: Magic Show
453: Skeletal Garage
454: Asylum Common Room
455: Lynching Yard
456: Occultic Garden
457: Dark Post Office
458: Black Wedding
459: Holy Portrait Hall
460: Rl'yeh Gate
461: Victorian Labs
462: Room of Globes
463: Hunter's Parlor
464: Retro TV Room
465: Hall of Miniatures
466: Persian Lounge
467: Photo Freak's Room
468: Maze of Screens
469: Pit of Sharp Objects
470: Pencilhead's Room
471: Puzzle Room
472: Key Cabinet
473: Room of Wooden Cubes
474: Room of Jackets
475: The Giant Cuckoo Clock
476: Rotary Room
477: Room of Lights
478: Swimmin' Hole
479: Typewriter Room
480: Smoking Parlor
481: Cigar Storeroom
482: Second Drawing Room
483: Murder Mystery Parlor
484: Golden Throne
485: Case-File Storeroom
486: Evidence Storage
487: Room of Pulleys
488: Slideshow Theater
489: Cassette Room
490: Room of Newspapers
491: House of Matches
492: Room covered in Duct Tape
493: Room of Plug-Ins
494: Static
495: Relaxation Chamber
496: Lake of Rust
497: Room of Passwords
498: Fishing Pond
499: Detective's Office
500: Pamphlet Office
submitted by RebelTheAnomaly to d100 [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
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